Le Corbusier – Oeuvre Plastique

£2,650.00

Original Le Corbusier Oeuvre Plastique Print

 

Year: 1953

Dimensions: 74.5 x 53 cm

Paper: Arches

Medium: Original stone lithograph

Printers: Mourlot

Condition: Near Mint

 

Le Corbusier Ouvre Plastique poster lithograph created for an exhibition at the Musee National D’Art Moderne. Printed by Mourlot, Paris.

Heidi Weber  encouraged Le Corbusier to give his poetry an expression which could be accessed and afforded by those who were interested in art, but who had limited financial resources. It began with copperplates which Heidi Weber brought to Le Corbusier to be engraved. She was able to convince him to create and distribute her concept. In spring 1960, Le Corbusier introduced her to the famous Parisian printer: Fernand Mourlot.

Although the creation of the individual lithographic works is solely due to Le Corbusier’s efforts, we have to thank Heidi Weber for the fact that these lithographic works actually came into existence, as the genesis of these works can be traced back to her initiative and her encouragement. Fernand Mourlot’s craftsmen’s artwork and precision ensured the quality of the lithographs.

 

 

THE ARTIST

LE CORBUSIER

b. 1887 La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland

 

Le Corbusier cannot be comprehended without including him as a painter, a draftsman and a graphic artist. Art was the foundation with which he built his architectural work upon and develop his modernist vision. Art inspired Le Corbusier to explore his ideas of architectural space, visions which were completely unique and yet to be realised at the time. He experimented with the dissolution and reconstruction of the three dimensional shapes, which can later be seen in his buildings and even in his urban architectural projects. The development that he underwent as an artist was parallel to his development as an architect. It is not without reason that he placed importance on the statement that the key to his architecture was to be found in his artistic work. Le Corbusier cannot be comprehended without including him as a painter, a draftsman and a graphic artist. Art was the foundation with which he built his architectural work upon and develop his modernist vision. Art inspired Le Corbusier to explore his ideas of architectural space, visions which were completely unique and yet to be realised at the time. He experimented with the dissolution and reconstruction of the three dimensional shapes, which can later be seen in his buildings and even in his urban architectural projects. The development that he underwent as an artist was parallel to his development as an architect. It is not without reason that he placed importance on the statement that the key to his architecture was to be found in his artistic work.
By 1920's Le Corbusier was an established architect, but it wasn't until forty years after his death that he gained recognition for his artwork, and the significance it held in art history. He gained strength and inspiration from his art: for decades he devoted every morning to his artwork. Art was “the key to my existence.”